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What’s ‘too big to fail’ again?

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The post What’s ‘too big to fail’ again? appeared first on Indexed.

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myhf
112 days ago
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Sydney, Australia
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Open Space

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myhf
171 days ago
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Sydney, Australia
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extra-flaky pie crust

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[Welcome back to ✨ Newer, Better Month ✨ on Smitten Kitchen, when I update a few SK classics with new knowledge, new techniques, and with real-life time constraints in mind. Previously.]

The concept of “newer better” is always going to be relative, and no more so than in this recipe. For all of the years I’ve been cooking, I’ve made pie dough one way. I shared the recipe with you in 2008, have referenced it in every recipe for pie since, and, until a couple years ago, never veered from it. My recipe is not an outlier; it contains the same ingredient ratios as 99% of American-style pie crust recipes out there. There might be variations in types of fats, preferred flours, sometimes there’s a little buttermilk or apple cider vinegar instead of some of the water or a little more or less sugar and salt, but they’re almost all the same ratio of fat to flour to water. It makes a great pie crust. Here’s where the relativity comes in: If you make pie crusts the way I’ve long made pie crusts and you’re happy with these pies, stop reading now. There’s nothing to see here! This isn’t for you! This is for people who have tried that fairly standard formula and found it lacking. A little tough. Not flaky enough. It comes up! I’m listening.

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myhf
251 days ago
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Sydney, Australia
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Calling out sick

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"With government shutdown threatening paychecks, more TSA agents calling out sick", NBC News; "TSA Workers Are Calling Out Sick as the Government Shutdown Rages On", Popular Mechanics; "Passengers at Sea-Tac miss flights as TSA agents call out sick amid government shutdown", KIRO 7; "TSA says increase in officers calling out sick hasn't impacted travel", WCNC; "Hundreds of TSA screeners, working without pay, calling out sick at major airports", Associated Press; "TSA Screeners Are Calling Out Sick", Bloomberg; "More TSA agents call out sick amid shutdown", Reuters; etc. etc.

Mark Dowson writes:

In my brit English it would be “calling in sick”, by analogy with an employee being told to “call in when you arrive at the work site”. Is this a brit English v. US English distinction?

I don't think so — the phrase I'm familiar with is "[call] in sick" and Google ngrams agrees:

…as does COCA, which finds 390 instances of [call] in sick, as opposed to 7 instances of [call] out sick.

So what's going on with all the TSA employees calling out sick?

My guess is that the "out" belongs with "sick" rather than with "call" — that is, the critical thing is that they're "out sick", i.e. "out due to (alleged) sickness", not that they've dutifully registered this fact (which is probably done via a web app rather than a phone call, though it's still called "calling" just as we "dial" keypads…).

You can't gracefully say that they're "calling in out sick", so "calling out sick" it is.

 

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myhf
327 days ago
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Sydney, Australia
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Snow Crystals | Wilson Bentley

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When Wilson Bentley died in 1931, his hometown newspaper eulogized him thus: “Longfellow said that genius is infinite painstaking. John Ruskin declared that genius is only a superior power of seeing. Wilson Bentley was a living example of this type of genius.”

A fine accolade for a photographer. Born in Vermont to a family prosperous enough to gift him a microscope at his 15th birthday, Bentley, for the next half a century, would go on to perfect a process of photographing snowflakes on black velvet before they melted away. Having grown up on a farm where the annual snowfall was 120 inches, Bentley’s obsession with precipitation began early, and sustained him throughout his life. As a young boy, Bentley would hand-draw pictures of snow crystals, and in his lifetime, Wilson made over 5,000 photographic negatives of dew frost, snowflakes, raindrops, clouds and fog. He wrote the entry on ‘snow’ in Encyclopedia Britannica.

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Although he was dismissed initially as an uneducated country bumpkin by the scientific community of the day (Bentley’s notes, laced with purple prose about nature and God did not help), towards the end of his life, his work was embraced and Bentley embarked on lecture tours across the United States. In fact, today, if you have seen a picture of a snowflake in a textbook or in a store, it was likely based off a Bentley photo. His book, Snow Crystals, illustrated with 2,500 photographs was still the definitive volume on the subject matter, and he sold many of his slides to colleges and universities. Bentley even sold 200 of his negatives to Tiffany’s in New York City, which used the snow crystal patterns in its jewelry designs. Bentley was also an early proponent of the theory that no two snowflakes were exactly alike, and his method to photograph snowflakes is still followed today, despite advancements in photography.



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myhf
327 days ago
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Sydney, Australia
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The Galaxy Tree

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The Galaxy Tree First came the trees. In the town of Salamanca, Spain, the photographer noticed how distinctive a grove of oak trees looked after being pruned. Next came the galaxy. The photographer stayed up until 2 am, waiting until the Milky Way Galaxy rose above the level of a majestic looking oak. From this carefully chosen perspective, dust lanes in the galaxy appear to be natural continuations to branches of the tree. Last came the light. A flashlight was used on the far side of the tree to project a silhouette. By coincidence, other trees also appeared as similar silhouettes across the relatively bright horizon. The featured image was captured as a single 30-second frame earlier this month and processed to digitally enhance the Milky Way.
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myhf
328 days ago
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Sydney, Australia
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